disabled shopping

Wheelchair with fleece lined cover attached

Keep Warm & Cosy With This Fleece Lined Cover – Review

Keep Warm & Cosy With This Fleece-Lined Cover – Review. A friend suggested I try this fleece-lined lower-body wheelchair cover as my legs are always cold, which causes me a lot of pain. Which is made worse when out and about, especially in cold weather. I have been using this cover for almost a week now. It’s probably the best product I have tried to date. So I wanted to share my experience with you.

The Product

Keep Warm & Cosy With This Fleece Lined Cover - Review Main wheelchair cover image

There were two items on Amazon (no, I’m not affiliated) practically identical. One was cheaper than the other, but didn’t look as good quality, therefore, I decided to go with this one. I am extremely happy with the one I purchased: Wheelchair Cover

It’s advertised as being suitable for people up to 5ft 9″ max. I would disagree with this. I’m 5ft 2″ and if I pull the cover up so the sides are at my waist (which is where I would expect them to be) I find my feet are hitting on the bottom inside of the cover (without shoes on), leaving me very little room for shoes or movement.

The back part of the cover has two elastic loops which you can put over your wheelchair backrest handles. I’m in an electric wheelchair, therefore, as I have no handles on my chair, I’ve had to use straps that I already had to attach to the loops (link at bottom of the page). Then I tie them around the bar behind my backrest. I do advise utilising these loops as they keep the cover in place whilst transferring in and out of your chair.

As we all know, it’s extremely expensive at present to put our heating on, therefore I use my fleece-lined cover even while sitting indoors. I also have a fleece-lined shawl that I wear with my lower body cover (link at bottom of the page) and I have found this allows me to sit indoors without having to put my heating on as often.

The outer cover is waterproof (the reason for me purchasing this). I have not used it in the rain as yet but it certainly looks like it will work well.

Using The Cover

This cover comes up to your waist area (depending on your height) with an extra bit that goes up the backrest part of your wheelchair. As I previously mentioned, the backrest has two loops attached so it can be hooked over the handles of a wheelchair. I find this helps the cover stay on your chair while transferring in/out of my wheelchair. I use velcro straps to attach the loops to my chair as I use an electric chair without handles.

The Lining

The lining is made of fleece. I find it to be extremely warm, my legs feel like I just got out of bed which they never feel that way during the day.  I did notice the first couple of times using this, the fluff transferred quite easily onto my clothes. The cover is washable, I’ve washed mine and it survived very nicely!

The bottom of the cover is almost an oval shape with no fleece lining on the inside. This makes sense as this is where your shoes would sit. This obviously would prevent dirt, muddy water etc from dirtying the inside fleece.

The Zip

There is a piece of string sewn into the front of the cover at the top. On the other end, you can tie it to the zip loop.  I find the string extremely useful as I don’t have to bend down to my feet area to grab the zip loop to close the cover. The zip is so easy to open, as all you have to do is gently pull apart the cover and the zip will slide down smoothly, meaning once again, no bending down needed. There is a loop on the inside and outside of the zip.

The cover doesn’t come completely apart, in the respect that the zip will open the cover to the bottom but the zip is sewn into the bottom. This way, you never have to start the zip off as it is always ready to go. Hopefully, the image below will show you what I mean.

One thing I will say, however, is that when trying to use the string to pull the zip up, I find it pulls the cover with it which doesn’t allow the zip to close. What I do, is use a foot to hold the cover down at the bottom of the zip while pulling on the string to close the zip.  I find this works a treat.

Conclusion

I’ve knocked off one star as the inside pocket is not placed correctly for proper use, something I would have used had I been able to. The pocket seems to be almost around my back and too low down for me to be able to use.

Other than that, I would highly recommend this cover as it is very warm and it will protect your legs in wet weather. Go on, treat yourself, I did lol.

Links
Velcro Straps
Fleece Shawl

If you would like to work with me don’t hesitate to Contact Me.  Feel free to leave a comment below.

White outlined wheelchair in shopping mall

Online Christmas Shopping During A Pandemic As A Disabled Person

Online Christmas Shopping During A Pandemic As A Disabled Person – On the high street as a full-time wheelchair user, shopping is difficult at the best of times. Throw in Christmas and it is a whole new ball game. Being in a pandemic and lockdown leaves me no other choice but to buy online! Do I prefer this to doing my shopping on the high street? What did I find to be the best and worst parts of shopping online for Christmas gifts?

I hate high street shopping at any time of the year. People, access, stupidity all add stress to what should be a normal part of my life! If you are an able-bodied person reading this, how many times in one shopping trip have you NOT been able to gain access to a shop because of steps? How many times have you NOT been able to browse around a shop due to clothes rails being so tightly packed together they hit your shoulder causing severe pain? Gone to a counter to pay and been ignored because the counter is so high you are NOT seen? Exactly!! I can experience each of these EVERY TIME I go shopping.

Benefits of Shopping Online

There are many benefits to shopping online.

  • It’s stress-free.
  • You can visit many different websites at the touch of a button.
  • Browse 1000’s of products in a short space of time.
  • You are not worrying about the next person bumping into you or clambering over your wheelchair.
  • Queue jumping because “they didn’t see you there”!
  • Best of all, left out in the cold because you can’t get into the shop!!

Online shopping gives you the freedom to search for what you want at a time that is right for you. Websites don’t have “opening times” the same as physical shops do! So, if you want to shop for a pair of socks at 2 am, you can!

If like me and you use a PC, then another benefit is you can have several tabs open comparing the same item across different sites to check for delivery time/charges, price of the item and of course returns policy. Can you imagine doing that on the high street, even if you’re not a wheelchair user? I love the fact I can sit at my desk, a cup of tea beside me and settle down to browse gifts for family/friends in the warmth of my own home.

The Downside of Shopping Online

When shopping online, images of products are of course going to be great looking. After all, the company is trying to sell you their product. You only have to read my review of Tapi Carpets to see the issues you can have.

  • You can’t feel the item – Texture, material
  • Smell the item – Some fake leather products can smell really bad
  • Colour is not always the same when viewing on a monitor
  • Judge sizing when shopping for items such as clothing.
  • Solitary experience.

I have bought things that look great online but once received, the material is of lesser quality, or the item is smaller, or worse, turns up broken or faulty. I have bought a Christmas present that looked a good size and quality online but having received it, I know it’s going to be a big disappointment to the recipient! No doubt it will have to be returned. Sometimes you just want to see an item in the flesh.

I have done 90% of my Christmas shopping online this year. I’ve used brand company websites, eBay and Amazon. Companies I’ve not been familiar with and I have to say, I’ve only had two incidents. One, where an item arrived broken and another replaced by a lesser quality item than what was advertised. Both of which have been sorted fairly easily.

Security Measures in Place

Online Christmas Shopping During A Pandemic As A Disabled Person - Safety - A as a padlock T as a key

Online Christmas Shopping During A Pandemic As A Disabled Person – Making sure you are aware of the pitfalls of shopping online is paramount! There are many ways things can go horribly wrong.

  • Identity theft.
  • Spam emails.
  • Fake websites.
  • Fake products.
  • Cloned bank card – To name a few.

However, research is everything! It is important to gather as much information as possible about the company you are shopping online with. Once you have done these checks a few times, it will become easier to spot a dodgy website/product.

  • Check websites address for HTTPS – If the company’s web address starts with HTTPS (especially on checkout pages), then you know your information is being sent over a secure network. – What is HTTPS?
  • Pay with Paypal where possible – If you pay by Paypal, the company you are purchasing from will NOT have any information regarding your card details. Only your name, address, email address and phone number if supplied. The beauty is, you don’t even need to have a Paypal account to do this.
  • Use a recommended website where possible – It’s always good practice to use website friends and family have used. You will know if they had a good or bad experience.
  • Check delivery and returns policy – Things can go wrong and for this reason, always check the returns policy and make sure you agree with the company’s terms. You don’t want to get caught out when things are too late.
  • Can you find the company address? – The Gov.uk website, says the following: Before an order is placed, you must provide: your business name, contact details and address, so it is helpful if you can find this as a lot of companies show pricing in GBP but originate and send products from another country.

Conclusion

If you do your research and check out the website the best you can, you should have a fairly pleasant experience. Yes, things will invariably go wrong, that’s life but you shouldn’t have too much of a problem getting the issue resolved. I will most definitely be doing my Christmas shopping online next year!

May I take this opportunity to wish you all very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! Please look after yourself and others. Here’s hoping next year will bring better things to all.

Santa in his sleigh with raindeers

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Hands holding a piece of paper with VAT at the top and coins and paper money in the background

Are You VAT Exempt?

Are You VAT Exempt? Did you know, as a disabled person, you may be exempt from having to pay VAT on certain items?? Neither did I!! According to Gov.uk website: If you’re disabled you’ll generally have to pay VAT on the things you buy, but VAT relief is available on a limited range of goods and services for disabled people. VAT relief may be available if you’re buying goods because of your disability. Source: Gov.uk

You’ll only be able to have eligible goods VAT-free if you’re chronically sick or disabled and the goods are for your personal or domestic use. You do not need to be registered disabled or eligible for any other benefit to qualify for VAT-free goods.

Goods you can buy VAT-free

This section has information on the goods you can buy VAT-free because of your disability including:

  • medical and surgical appliances
  • invalid wheelchairs and mobility scooters
  • equipment to aid the hard of hearing, and low vision aids
  • specialist beds, chair and stairlifts, rise and recline chairs and other lifting equipment and sanitary devices
  • goods that have been designed solely for disabled people
  • computer equipment
  • emergency alarm call systems
  • boats
  • parts and accessories


You can hire or lease eligible goods VAT-free if you’re disabled. Your retailer or other supplier is responsible for checking if the goods are eligible to sell VAT-free.

Medical and surgical appliances

You’ll not have to pay VAT when you buy medical or surgical appliances that are designed solely for the relief of a severe abnormality or severe injury such as amputation, rheumatoid arthritis, learning difficulties or blindness.

Appliances that can be bought VAT-free include:

  • invalid wheelchairs
  • certain types of mobility scooters
  • leg braces
  • neck collars
  • oxygen concentrators
  • specialist clothing
  • specialist footwear
  • wigs

Items that you cannot buy VAT-free include bandages, plasters or other wound dressings and dentures (unless you buy them from a dentist or other dental care professional).

For full information, please visit: www.gov.uk

If you liked my blog, leave a comment below. If you would like to work with me, or if there is anything you would like me to blog about, don’t hesitate to Contact Me.

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